WKU POP 201

Introduction to Popular Culture Studies

Designing for Spreadability part 2

Posted by Kimberlea Ferrell on April 10, 2017

Of the topics in tonight’s reading, I think I found the section about parodies to be my favorite. I distinctly remember an episode of Phineas and Ferb that parodied the Leeroy Jenkins bit at some point. Usually when I think of parody, I’m reminded of Team Four Star’s Dragonball Z Abridged series, parodying the anime. They also do an abridged series for Hellsing Ultimate. I’ve also come across plenty of Steven Universe parodies as well. We love to connect the things we enjoy to other things in our lives in some way or another.

The section about unfinished content reminded me of something Markiplier did a while ago. This is a little different than the examples in the text but it follows the same thread. Lots of people have created “choose your own story” videos, and Markiplier underwent this process recently. In the video, annotations pop up for you to click, depending on the choice you want to make, and will take you to the corresponding video. While you can not directly control the story, it is still up to you what you see happen. Without your actions, it doesn’t go on to the next video, and there is no long story.

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One Response to “Designing for Spreadability part 2”

  1. Sean Hull said

    I’m glad you brought up the more wholesome fan-created type of parody, as the examples in the book, though more relevant to advertisers, come off as rather cynical; I can’t think of the last time I appreciated an ad that made use of an existing media franchise to try and sell me something. No matter how well-done it may be, an ad that parodies an existing media franchise in some attempt to ingratiate itself with said franchise’s fans will always seem less-than-sincere to me, to the point where I become disgusted rather than interested by the advertised product.

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