WKU POP 201

Introduction to Popular Culture Studies

Archive for April, 2017

Where Web 2.0 Went Wrong, Part 2 (2/9)

Posted by sydneyb612 on April 30, 2017

The idea of web 2.0 is starting to make a lot more since to me now that the explained it in this chapter. So, from what I understand they are saying that this term “web 2.0” is talking about that this web is for promoting and distributing ideas and things on the internet. This is the group of people that strategically plan what is going to pop up on your screen, to side or in the middle of what you are doing online. It is sort of weird to think how much work and effort is put into trying to sell people stuff or promote stuff online. Do they individual customize every computer or do they just take the social norm or what people like? It is scary to think how much control people on another computer screen have over your computer. People always say nothing on the internet is private and everything you search is basically recorded. Most people take this with a grain of salt, but this is harder to do when you know more about what is going on in the background of the deep dark web. In the book the authors also talk about how little control users have of what they are seeing on their computer screens. I know you can block ads and set certain things online to private, but how private can you make your computer without paying some sort of cost or consequence. Should more users be concerned about what is going on on the other side of their screens?

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The Value of Media Engagement P2 (02/28)

Posted by katemilner9 on April 30, 2017

)This portion of reading did a really good job at bringing up how many unknowns there are in considering the audience of a media. It really is all just a guessing game when it comes down to it. In an industry where it makes all the difference what ads you choose to run, and what audience is pursuing the goods and services advertised. It’s hard to know what you’re advertising for when you can’t get an accurate read on your consumers. It leads to the failure of some seemingly popular cult series. When shows assume the target audience, and they assume wrong, the advertisements don’t properly work. Advertisers pull their support, and  without advertisers to support the series, there’s no money to continue on with it. It doesn’t make sense to move forward with a project if the distributor isn’t able to profit off of it.

This guessing of audience has become even harder with the introduction of online streaming, and easier access to illegal, pirated copies of shows. Finding a live stream of your favorite show, or a download after the episode has aired doesn’t contribute to its ratings in the first place, and it also makes it harder for the media distributor to get a gauge on it’s audience. We oftentimes forget, in this age when everything is at our disposal with little to no work, our engagement with medias we enjoy are vital to their success and survival. We need to keep in mind the importance of our support, and be more conscious viewers.

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Where Web 2.0 Went Wrong Part 1 (2/7)

Posted by sydneyb612 on April 30, 2017

First off I would like to say that the statistic of people seeing three thousand to five thousand adds a day is insane. I never really notice much about adds because whether I’m scrolling through Facebook or just watching TV I usually just ignore or scroll through ads and don’t even think about them twice. Anyways I read the article “The Value of Consumer Recommendation”. I liked this article because it was very personal to the authors real life experiences which was refreshing to read. Now days when you read article like that it is all just facts and statistics, which gets boring after a while. Hearing stories and personal accounts makes the consumer want to read more. I liked when she told the story about her Uncle Joe that was a nice touch. As I consumer when I buy stuff online or watch something or buy a certain name brand product I will not post about it online or do a review I usually spread it by word of mouth, which in this day in age does not do much. Now as a consumer I do read other people reviews and recommendations online which is some of what the author talked about. How reliable are these reviews and recommendations? I honestly could not tell you. Do I believe most of the reviews I read? The answer is yes. Why am I so trusting and should I be? I do not know. I do think people should be me aware of reviews and recommendations online.

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Thinking Transnationally 2 (04/25/17)

Posted by briannaembry on April 30, 2017

spreadability and cultural diversity are very directly related in the since of as the spreadability of media content increases, the amount of potential cultural diversity also increases. Spreadability, of both mass and niche media content, allows for more people to view this information, perhaps spreading it along and creating a fan base. On a transnational spread level, cultures are able to exchange memes, content, videos, and even music tastes. I would venture out to say that, as an avid user of social media, the most spreadable transnational content I see comes from the UK. This makes sense, as there is not language barrier within this content with the United States. However, recently, I have been noticing a huge rise in the existence of Korean media and K-pop in the Untied States.

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Why Media Spreads Part 2 (2/2)

Posted by sydneyb612 on April 30, 2017

I believe a valid point was made when they were talking about content creators and content consumers. In the book, they talked about the fine line that laid between them. This is interesting because I never really realized this, but that is very true. Without creators creating something, there is nothing to consume and without consumers giving feedback and participating in what is created there would not be something to consume because it would be shut down due to ratings. When consumers come together they can advertise a brand or a product more than the creator can because the consumers are real people with real opinions that are not as bias as the advertising that the creators would put out there. The point though is that media is spread so easily. Consumers can create content and creators consume content, so that where I think that fine line come into play. No one really knows who the real creators are and who the real consumers are because everybody is truly a little bit of both. Yes, people know who wrote that movie or who produced that video, but it is shared and liked and retweeted and reposted so many times the average consumer would have to dig deep to find that information out. I also thought the different names they used for fan fiction were strange. When they said brand hijacking and copy right misuse. That’s not a smart move on the creators part to talk about their consumers in such a negative way.

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Reappraising the Residual p2 (02/21)

Posted by katemilner9 on April 30, 2017

The example of residual media in the form of WWE Classics On Demand made the entire concept a lot more clear, as that’s something we see all time anymore. The idea of making backlogs and older “exclusive” content accessible almost seems more appealing than creating new content. We see it all the time, now not just on a fan level, but from the distributors, who like the then WWF, learned that there’s a market in saying that it’s a retro, seldom seen version of what fans still like today. It’s considered to make you a real fan, of any form of media, to have consumed as much of it as possible- to know it’s entire history, and retro branding like this makes it easier for fans to dig through backlogs, and find missing pieces to the narratives that create the “real fan” that’s valued above the rest.

Overall though, it really is just a great example of the success a company can find when they listen to what their audiences want. Instead of relying on grassroots to take care of providing the fanbase with what they want, media distributors can take the steps to accommodate the wants of audiences, which’ll not only help to keep the fans pleased, but will encourage them to engage with the media more, and hopefully, contribute more money to the media. It’s a part of the ongoing debate we see revolving around media creators doing what’s economic, or sound by business, or what their audience wants- and how the two can intersect, and be the same thing if people are just willing to take a chance.

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Meaningful Participation! (3/28)

Posted by tommistowers on April 30, 2017

While reading this online essay it made me realize how the older shows in the late 1990’s often invited their audience to participate. In the essay Television’s Invitation to Participate showed great examples of audience participation. The essay states that there are three forms of invitation emerging: overt invitation, organic invitations, and obscured invitations. An overt invitation was where the television show obviously invites a viewer to become involved. Back in the 90’s, American Idol and America’s Best Dance Crew had a huge audience participation where the audience chose who they wanted to stay. Now a-days, there’s only a few shows such as The Voice. An organic invitation is where a television show assumes that viewers are already engaged. The best example back in the 90’s was Degrassi. The teens on Degrassi were texting, IM’ing, and using social media throughout the show. A great example now a-days is Pretty Little Liars. I chose Pretty Little Liars because you constantly see them texting each other throughout the show and receiving a text from “A”. An obscured invitation is where a television show demands viewers to unravel the meaning. In the 90’s the television that often did this was Lost by hiding meanings throughout the island and about the island and characters itself. A great example of this obscured meaning now a-days is the hit television show Prison Break. Prison Break does ab excellent job about hiding the meaning throughout every episode and leaving you with questions. Especially the new season that just came out. I chose this specific reading because it caught my eye to all the different television shows that were and still are having participating throughout their audiences without them even knowing.

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Extra Credit: FOLD PROJECT

Posted by tommistowers on April 30, 2017

For my extra credit blog post, I chose to talk about the fold project by Kimberlea Ferrell about professional wrestling. I chose this fold project because I don’t know much about professional wrestling. Kimberlea sectioned her fold project off into roots in the carnival, the WWWF, events that happen with the creation of professional wrestling, and fan entertainment. The roots in the carnival section talks about how terms such as kayfabe are still used today. Kayfabe means to do everything possible to maintain the fiction of wrestling. This term is important to wrestling because the audience need to believe the fight is real. The World Wide Wrestling Federation was created by Jess McMahon and Toots Mondt in 1963. In 1979, Vincent McMahon took over the company from his father. McMahon changed the world with what he did next. McMahon created Wrestlemania in 1985 in an attempt to gain more money. Wrestlemania then became an extreme hit that then he created more pay-per-view shows such as SummerSlam and Royal Rumble. While looking at Kimberlea’s project the last section really stood out to me. She mentions multiple points about fan entertainment. The wrestlers chose their next move based on the audience and their fans. The reactions of the fans can influence if the wrestlers stay on script or deviate to appease their fans. Overall, I am glad I chose to talk about this fold project as my extra credit blog post. I learned a lot about professional wrestling and how the creation began through this project. Good Job Kimberlea!!

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Designing for Spreadability Pt. 2 (4/11)

Posted by tommistowers on April 30, 2017

During this section the chapter talks about the designing for spreadability media and what it takes to be successful. To be a successful creator you need to realize one thing, the media is unpredictable. Lotz states that Television, film, and recording industry executives all work in the universe in which they know full well that more than 80 percent f what they develop and create will fail commercially. The key problem is they don’t know which 10 or 20 percent might actually succeed. Successful creators understand the strategy and technical aspects it takes to make a content more likely to spread. Some strategy and technical aspects involve how the content is made easily accessible to their audience and something that is useful to the audience. Some steps to becoming a successful creator include availability, portable, easily reusable, and relevance. The availability is the first big step. You want to make your content available whenever and wherever for your audience for it to become useful. Availability also connects with portable because audiences want the content “on the go”, that why they aren’t stuck in one place. Easily reusable is just media that simply spreads and spreads quickly. The last step stuck out to me the most, relevant to multiple audiences. Relevant to multiple audiences means that your content does not just target on a set audience. When your content connects to all ages your product will become more successful. Once you have a content that grabs someone’s interest that is the first key to success on making your content spreadable. This section made me realize that it is hard for content to start spreading believe it or not. Reading the percentages really shocked me because I would’ve never had guessed that number would’ve been so high. I also learned how to make content more successful for the future.

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In Conclusion… 04/27/17

Posted by briannaembry on April 30, 2017

Overall, Spreadable Media is not the type of book that I would pick up from a shelf and start reading on a whim. However, this book is really well-written and provides some valuable information on the topic of pop culture today. I believe that the biggest thing that I pulled from this book and applied to real life is based around participatory culture. IN any form of media, the audience is the most important part. The audience or fan-base of the media is responsible for the spreadability and circulation of the work. Companies make their money based on the choices that the audience makes, whether it is to watch that 30 second ad on your favorite YouTube blogger’s video, or even liking that photo that your favorite brand posted on Facebook last week. I never realized what an impact we have on the media today until I read this book. We control the fate of spreadbility and that is a big deal to the fate of media and brands.

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