WKU POP 201

Introduction to Popular Culture Studies

Spreadable Media.

Posted by aiyanarudolph on October 30, 2016

“Try as we might to identify common features or characteristics, we fool ourselves if we think we can anticipate a formula for producing creative content likely to catch the cultural fancy of any particular audience at any given moment.” The above quote really stuck with me throughout this article. I completely agree that there is no way to determine if something is going to be creative or a hit. Cultural is ever changing, and there is not set way to determine if that YouTube video or that text post you put on Tumblr is going to be liked or reblogged enough times for you to have it spread throughout those various forms of media. For example, if we look at how the app Vine is now closing down, we can see how spreadable media is never guaranteed. Vine was hugely popular when it first came out, and so many people have gained popularity (Thomas Sander’s being my favorite) because of it. But now those same people are having to find other modes of spreadable media to show their creativity. I know that since the announcement of Vine closing down, everyone on social media are sharing their favorite vines again as a sort of way to commemorate the app. Will this lead to Vine no longer closing down because viewership is going up again? As the article says, nobody knows. What I do know is that I have watched the Sassy Hydra Agent vine at least twelve times over the last two days and I feel no shame.

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3 Responses to “Spreadable Media.”

  1. mhlowhorn said

    I never actually downloaded the Vine app myself, but I always watched Vines when they came up on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or other social media. I assume enough people have done that, that’s why Vine is being shut down. I read an article somewhere that said downloads of the app have dropped 55% in the past year. Also, when Vines get shared to other social media sites, those sites can make more money off of advertising for it than Vine actually does. It’s so weird–since I am always seeing Vines all over the internet, it doesn’t seem like the company would be struggling, but now it makes sense. I guess in a way, Vine’s spreadability is part of what led to its downfall.

  2. daniellemullins483 said

    I watched this like 1200 times trying to figure out why I have never seen this kid in class… then realized hes vinefamous lol.

    Maybe the whole #RIPVINE deal was just a publicity stunt?

  3. lucdigi said

    I had Vine for a couple of months when I first got to college in 2013, but never spent much time on it. Where did this Vine shutdown come from? I hadn’t heard anything about it and then all of a sudden it was everywhere!!

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